Hey guys, I know it’s stupidly gorgeous outside, and this is a 1000+ word piece about the arts economy and social connections as a form of wealth. I think what you should do is read this article, and tell me what you think, sunshine be damned. There’s a lot in here to chew on, develop, and pick apart and put back together again so it works better. If we do it right, it’ll be a good way to approach arts entrepreneurship.

Great write up of the basic economics of being a musician, and framing the DIY vs. pay someone else or go “big content” decision. (via Musicians’ Teammates and their Effect on Earnings | Artist Revenue Streams)

Great write up of the basic economics of being a musician, and framing the DIY vs. pay someone else or go “big content” decision. (via Musicians’ Teammates and their Effect on Earnings | Artist Revenue Streams)

I’m home sick today, and I wanted to composer. But I’m sick, so instead I wrote 1000 words about the future of the arts economy and Amanda Palmer.

Very strong post from John Scalzi on context for Amanda Palmer’s Kickstarter success (via Amy Berg, @bergopolis). And here are some longwinded thoughts of mine on lessons to take from the strucutre of her Kickstarter itself on how to build yours: http://kevinclarkcomposer.com/2012/04/learn-kickstarer-from-afp/

Arts career thought of the day

It’s really easy to turn excitement into money - fans buy
things.

It’s REALLY hard to turn money into excitement - you can’t pay
people to love you.

Whenever you see that rare chance to spend money and create excitement (for example by promoting your show), do it. Excitement is super valuable in the long term, and can, yes, yield lots of money.

The best way to have a successful career in the arts is to value love over money. And by the arts I mean everything.

This is a long one, but I think it’s important.